30 Day Writing Challenge When You’re Lacking Motivation

November 18, 2020

Hi there fellow person, need some inspiration?

Me too sometimes. In this blog post, I want to throw some writing prompts, blogging services, and resources out there to grab your attention and build your audience. You can’t always force inspiration, but you can certainly encourage it!

How do you write? Do you journal? Do you write free style, edit as you go, or use outlines? Do you write with pen and paper, type, or write on with your thumbs (phone machine)? I’ve done all of the above and I think all writers would profoundly agree that writing is a practice.

Writing is a muscle you have to work out and when you don’t, it can become weak and flabby.

I think it would be a disservice not to mention how important it is to steal from others. I’m not saying steal children, valuables, or office supplies from your company (because no one has ever done that). Steal inspiration. Cue inspirational quote. 

“Good writers borrow, great writers steal.”

T.S. Eliot

Every writer hits a wall at some point and can’t find inspiration, even if it’s just for a few hours. I’ve watched movies and read books and thought, “This is great, I appreciate this.” I’ve watched different movies and read different books and thought, “I could’ve done so much better.” Please tell me you’ve thought that before and I’m not just a pretentious snobby goober.

In this post, you’ll find motivation and inspiration by stealing from others but not so much that you’ll get in trouble for plagiarizing. If you do get in trouble, I might pretend I don’t know you.

START with telling yourself why…why oh why oh why? If you aren’t motivated are you just having a bad day or are you forcing something that isn’t there? Side note…this doesn’t count if you’re in school. If you’re unmotivated to finish a paper for class, make some coffee, put on some sweatpants, and write the darn thing.

Eh hem, where was I?

Why are you staring at a blank screen?

If you have a love and a passion for writing and want your words to see the light of day, say your reason. Say your “why.” Say it out loud, write it on a sticky note, write it in lipstick on your bathroom mirror, whatever you have to do to remind yourself why you’re reading a blog post to find motivation to keep writing.

NEXT find a writing podcast. There’s a ton of good podcasts out there, try a few on and see which one inspires you the most. Listen whenever you can, while you’re on the toilet, cooking, or driving, preferably not while doing all three at the same time. Passion from others can be a huge boost. Here’s a few to get started!

What’s your favorite podcast and which one inspires you the most? Are they the same one?

Use social media groups to engage with your people. I’ve found the best place to do this is on Facebook or Pinterest groups. Search writing groups, blogging groups, writers in your city, or people who write about the same niche. Find other crazy like-minded persons who will provide inspiration, motivation, and support. Many of the groups are private and might have a questionnaire attached before you are accepted into their club. It’s okay, if you like the group, drink the Kool-Aid, you can always leave.

ALSO believe in yourself and don’t think about it too too much. Don’t think about it too little. Think about it just the write amount (see what I did there?). If this is your passion, you wake up everyday thinking about it and you can’t wait to dive in most days, just believe in yourself. No more negative self-talk. You’re doing this, let’s go.

GET hands-on motivation. Look at art. Watch nature. Push a mean person off a balcony and see how you feel. Read sarcasm and try not to react like it’s genuine. Do a routine thing extra extra slow and just observe. Read lots of things and pull inspiration from those lots of things. 

I write about a grounding activity I use occasionally while writing posts. Check out this blog post where I use a grounding activity I also use with clients as a social worker. It’s helpful to look at your surroundings and pull from your environment to write your article. This makes it more realistic and readers and sense when something is genuine.

Oh yeah, and look at writing prompts. Don’t forget to do that.

“Writing is easy. All you have to do is cross out the wrong words.”

Mark Twain

FICTION WRITING PROMPTS

  1. Write a myth to explain why it rains.
  2. Start the first paragraph of a short story using these five words: assassin, chainsaw, corduroy, lasagna, & llama.
  3. Write a flaw for a main character.
  4. Restart the following story 3 different times and stop after 400 words: “You meet in the backseat of a car with…”
  5. Tell the story of your first love from the perspective of a squirrel.
  6. Reach into your purse or backpack and write about the item you grab as if it was given to you by a celebrity.
  7. Write a poem about an alleyway in the winter.
  8. Write about your pregnancy mood swings in run-on sentences – yes even if you’re a dude.
  9. Start a story by giving step-by-step instructions on how to commit the perfect crime.
  10. Write about the best meal you could ever have in a place you’ve never been.
  11. Tell the story of the time you rode on a butterfly to visit a long-lost friend.
  12. Take 2+ pages to describe giving someone a terrible gift and watching them open it and react.
  13. Explain the time you used the spice rack to time travel.
  14. Open the Google and close your eyes. Type quickly for 1 second and write a story about the first search result.
  15. When you’re out in the world running errands and such, find a person to watch without them knowing and write their life story.

NONFICTION WRITING PROMPTS

  1. Create a letter for the year 2020.
  2. Describe your morning/nighttime routine.
  3. Discuss a project you’re working on either at home or online.
  4. Share a playlist for different activities.
  5. Talk about your mentor or someone who inspires you.
  6. Explain your favorite hygiene, skin care, hair care, or makeup products.
  7. Write about your favorite vacation spot.
  8. Discuss a motto you live by.
  9. Share a lesson you’ve learned the hard way.
  10. Write about shows you’ve binged on in the last year.
  11. Explain one odd thing you love to do.
  12. Share your self-care routine.
  13. Describe what you learned and mistakes you made in your last relationship.
  14. Create a letter to your future self.
  15. Write your most repeated prayers.

Journaling also helps me big time. I get so many ideas mid-journaling that I sometimes stop halfway through a…

Here’s a quick list of five journals to check out. I’ve been using the first one and I have the others on my list to try out!
🔆 A Year of Zen: A 52-Week Guided Journal – I love this one because it’s not overwhelming. I’ve had this journal for about five months and I just love it. It’s not a daily journal, so I don’t feel guilty when I don’t sit down and do it everyday. I always feel like journaling at some point in the week and when that happens, I write.
🔆 True You: A Self-Discovery Journal of Prompts and Exercises to Inspire Reflection and Growth – The title might be a mouthful but it looks like there’s a lot of inspirational content and cute illustrations. Somethings that’s all you need to get the ideas rolling.
🔆 Wreck This Journal: Now in Color – Okay this one is just super fun. This might not help with actually writing down words but I can see how this could definitely get the creative muse juices flowing.
🔆 100 Things I Love About You: A Journal – This one is a short-and-sweet-get-to-the-point-journal…it’s all in the name.
🔆 1Life ROADMAP Journal: Adult Edition – This goes out to all my Type-A friends out there. Sometimes I wish I could be more like you but I’m not so I’ll probably never get this journal, BUT I can appreciate it from afar.

Which of these ideas will you try?

Did this list break you out of your slump? Did it get the juices going? Let me know what kind of juice and let me know what you think!

2 Comments

  • film

    November 24, 2020 at 9:53 pm

    I loved your blog article. Thanks Again. Keep writing. Lind Khalil Ron

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